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Plants That Keep Ticks Away

Many pests harm plants when they feed on them. To help combat their pest problem, some plants have a built-in defense mechanism—their scent. Adding plants that naturally repel pests, like ticks, to your garden can help prevent them from taking over your yard. We’ve made a list of plants that can help keep ticks away.                                        

Rosemary

Rosemary

While this herb is a tasty addition to your dishes, it can also help keep ticks away. Rosemary has needle-like leaves and blue, white, or pink flowers. Its native home is the Mediterranean region, so it likes environments that are warm with fair humidity. This plant thrives in sunlight, but it does require well-drained soil. Though you can plant rosemary as a seed, you’ll likely find more success growing it from the cuttings of a grown plant.

Lemongrass

Lemongrass

Lemongrass is known for its lemon fragrance, which happens to send ticks and other pests running. It thrives in areas with plenty of light, heat, and moisture. Lemongrass does best when it receives at least six hours of sunlight each day. It’s important to keep its roots moist. Since lemongrass won’t survive frosts, you need to plant it in the spring when the chance of frost has passed.

Beautyberry

Beautyberry

These plants are known for their bright purple berries that grow around the stem of the plant. They bloom from June to August and can be planted in the fall or spring. Beautyberry plants prefer moist soil that contains organic matter and does well with full sun exposure or partial shade. The more beautyberry plants in an area, the better growth you will see with the berries.

Fleabane Daisy

Fleabane Daisy

Though this flower is called fleabane, it’s known for helping to keep ticks away. Fleabane daisies have fuzzy stems and leaves and a yellow and white flower. They thrive with full sun exposure but need moist and well-drained soil. If you are in a hot climate, you’ll want to provide some shade for these flowers. It’s important to note that some of these plants are considered invasive, so be sure to choose a native species like the Santa Barbara daisy.

Marigolds

Marigold

Marigolds come in a variety of colors including orange, white, and yellow. They bloom from spring to fall and should be planted after the last spring frost. They thrive in warm climates with plenty of sunlight and well-drained soil. Cool weather combined with too much moisture and shade can cause powdery mildew. It’s best to water marigolds at the base of the plant.

Rue

Rue

Rue is another plant that can help repel ticks. These plants have yellow flowers and blue-green leaves. They can be grown indoors or outside. Rue needs full sun exposure and well-drained soil. It’s fairly drought tolerant and doesn’t need too much water. One thing to keep in mind is that its sap can irritate skin, so make sure to be careful and use gloves when handling.

Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums

If you’re looking for protection from ticks in the fall, chrysanthemums can help. These flowers have a wide spectrum of colors. They should be planted early in the spring to help ensure summer and fall blooming. These flowers don’t do well when left in water. Their roots will begin to rot. Make sure the soil is moist, but has proper drainage and that they receive plenty of sunlight.

Mint

Mint

This fresh smelling herb is great to eat and for repelling pests. Plants in the mint family have square stems and many have small, pink, white, or purple flowers. Mint can be grown in your home or outside. It is known to spread quickly, so using containers will help to keep it from taking over your garden. Plant in a sunny location and keep the soil moist for best results. 

Chamomile

Chamomile

Not only can you make a tasty cup of tea, you can also use chamomile to deter ticks. These flowers have a yellow center and white petals. They grow fairly quickly and should be planted in the spring for a summer bloom. It thrives in sunlight, but can survive in partial shade. When first planted, you’ll want to make sure it gets about an inch of water each week. Once grown, you’ll be able to space out when you water it.

Thyme

Thyme

Another herb that’s great for cooking and pest control is thyme. This gray-green herb does well when planted in the spring. Small flowers bloom in the summer. Thyme thrives with sunlight so make sure to plant it in a sunny area. When the top inch of soil becomes dry, you’ll want to water it. Thyme can be grown outside in the ground or containers as well as in your home as long as it has access to sunlight.

Since plants do such a great job of repelling pests, it makes sense to team up with them. Adding a few of these plants to your yard can help keep ticks away. You can also use a plant-based insecticide spray like our Mosquito & Tick Killer. It’s made with natural plant essential oils to help kill ticks on contact while providing you with a residual repellency.


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